Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Majano anemone infestation

  1. #1
    Full Colony Member Stev-O's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Bakersfield
    Posts
    1,526
    First Name
    Steven
    Occupation
    Turn to the left....and cough....!!!!
    Referred to CVR by
    Keith and Chris at Whities

    Majano anemone infestation

    Ok, since the beginning of my tank, there had always been aiptasia and majano anemones that came in with the LR or rubbles that some corals are attached to. But over the past 2 years, along with the growth of the livesotck, so have the aiptasia and majano.

    Aiptasia, I've put in countless peppermints shrimps and 2 copperband butterfly which the first one didn't make it The second one is doing quite well and eating frozen food. The aiptasia population is getting smaller each week. I know berghia nudibranch will also take care of the aiptasia so in the future when my tank stablizes from this last Stev-O booboo I might have to give it a try.

    Majano
    http://www.saltvannsakvariet.no/pest%20anemoner.jpg

    However, the majano have not been affected by either treatment so far. As a matter of fact, as the aiptasia gets less, they are becoming more and more prominant and a major eyesore. I've found a couple quick reads about what might control the majano as I know joes juice and kalk injections (short of taking out the whole rock and pasting it) just haven't worked for me in the past.

    http://www.advancedaquarist.com/2005/8/aaeditorial
    Mentions a double saddle butterfly, but on liveaquaria it's listed as non-reef compatible.

    http://reefkeeping.com/issues/2006-05/bp/index.php
    Mentions nudibranch as a form of predation control, but how can one be certain which type of nudi one is outting into the tank won't eat precious corals?

    Does anyone out there have a cure, solution, answer to my majano anemone infestation problem? Please post suggestions, links, thought.

    Thanks
    Stev-O
    "Life is not measured by the breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."
    "Everybody wants to go to heaven, but nobody wants to die."

    Tank(s): 90G 3'x2'x2' glass Single corner overflow with 20G acrylic growout and 15G sump
    Lights: 400W SE 14K Hamilton on Reeflux ballast with Luminarc III reflector
    Experience: off and on since 1994

  2. #2
    Frag Member fload's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Bakersfield Ca
    Posts
    129
    First Name
    Jesse
    Referred to CVR by
    darryl
    i had about 20 in my tank at one time just did kalk paste method and it seemed to work i only have one or two in my tank now (that i can see) i dunno any other method if u can find any other method of control let me know...

  3. #3
    Full Colony Member BoomerD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Mo-Town
    Posts
    2,163
    First Name
    Boomer
    Occupation
    retired
    Referred to CVR by
    Whoday
    Joe's Juice or a strong kalk paste. The more you can get into the mouth of the anemone, the better your chances of killing them.





    Tank(s): tankless
    Lights: dim
    Experience: 350,000 years

  4. #4
    G-Nik
    Guest
    I've read that the reproductive capacity of Majano is a lot less than Aiptasia so an increasing populations suggests lots of nutrients for them. I had about 50 Aiptasia and one Majano about a year ago, added a Copperband and now I have zero Aiptasia in the dipslay and still the one Majano in plain sight. Maybe the Copperband has been eating tiny ones before they become visible to me, but it certainly has shown no interest in the larger one (dime-sized). Maybe that is a good thing, because it has shown no interest in coral polyps either.

    FWIW, I tried Berghia nudibranchs a couple of times, but they didn't do the job. I think you need a large population of Aiptasia to keep them fed. Once anemones are few and far between, I don't know that they are always able to home in on the last ones in order to sustain themselves. It looks to me that they cannot detect them until they get pretty close. If they miss a couple and you relocate the Berghia or they just starve, Aiptasia will recolonize. Copperband seems to be an ideal solution if they take prepared food and and also find enough wild critters for a varied diet, but unless they really do eat very young Majano, they may not be of much use for their control.

    12:30 PM: What a coincidence, just looked and my Majano it's gone! Can't find it anywhere. It was there yesterday, I swear. It either moved off and hid or Copperband got tired of looking at it. I better keep an eye on CB in case it develops less desirable tastes.
    Last edited by G-Nik; 01-19-2007 at 01:31 PM.

  5. #5
    Branching Member kewwlkat123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Bakersfield, CA
    Posts
    788
    First Name
    Tyson
    Occupation
    I.T.
    Referred to CVR by
    Stev-O

  6. #6
    Frag Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Madera
    Posts
    168
    First Name
    Erik
    I also have been having a problem with a out break of Anemonia majano. It has been an exasperating process trying to get rid of them all. I have found physical removal with a razor blade of scalpal has worked quite well. This process unfortunately is extremely tedious, and if any portion of the anemone is left it will regrow. I have also been using a product called Aptasia Control made by Blue Life that I have had decent success with, but again is a tedious method for control. I have been unsuccessful in trying to find any means of biological control for Anemonia majano, all methods mentioned seem to be for aptasia. If you do come across any biological means for control I would be extremely interested.

    Good Luck w/ Eradication!

  7. #7
    Branching Member Suohhen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tracy
    Posts
    619
    First Name
    Sean
    Occupation
    Forklift Operator and Student Pilot
    Referred to CVR by
    google
    I would be patient with the CB, mine ate about 50 of them in 2 days, 2 weeks after I got it and ever since I have not had a single visable aiptasia. If you use Joe's juice in combination that works well to keep them small enough to keep the CB interested.

  8. #8
    G-Nik
    Guest
    I haven't had much luck with the chemical treatments, and I think I have tried them all. What did work the best for me was injecting 4N (16 g / 100 ml) sodium hydroxide. It's a lot hotter than calcium hydroxide and it will burn you, so be careful not to get it on anything you don't want to kill. It quickly forms a relatively harmless precipitate in seawater, so its not like it will drift off and kill stuff, but it will leave a white, barren patch on the rock where it is initially applied. A 2N solution is safer where neighbors are a concern, but also not as effective. It does a pretty good job on small Aiptasia, especially if their foot is easy to get to, but often requires repeat applications. It's also pretty tough to wield a syringe with precision in every nook and cranny you need to get to. Hard to beat a Copperband with the right attitude, at least for Aiptasia.

  9. #9
    Full Colony Member Stev-O's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Bakersfield
    Posts
    1,526
    First Name
    Steven
    Occupation
    Turn to the left....and cough....!!!!
    Referred to CVR by
    Keith and Chris at Whities
    Thanks for the replies guys. Yeah, the aiptasia is definitely much better since the addition of the current CBB. I also added 3 peppermints just to get potential additive effects.

    But it's the majanos that's the problem. I guess I'll have to try injecting kalk again. Man, that really bites and is quite tedious and no guarantee of success. Also it could potentially leach and kill off nearby corals...oh wait, I actually did that already with the whole tank kalk nuke...sigh...

    So besides that double saddle butterfly and certain nudibranches, anyone knows of predators for majano that's reef safe?
    "Life is not measured by the breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."
    "Everybody wants to go to heaven, but nobody wants to die."

    Tank(s): 90G 3'x2'x2' glass Single corner overflow with 20G acrylic growout and 15G sump
    Lights: 400W SE 14K Hamilton on Reeflux ballast with Luminarc III reflector
    Experience: off and on since 1994

  10. #10
    G-Nik
    Guest
    Haven't seen this link mentioned yet:
    http://www.wetwebmedia.com/anemoniafaqs.htm

    "The usual Aiptasia predators will show not interest in A. Majano. The only reliable predators are large angels (Blueface, Majestic, and Emperors) and a few decidedly non-reef-safe butterflies.
    The upside is that they are much more leathery than Aiptasia and if you can get to the base, they can be cleanly plucked from the rock. For those imbedded in a hole, a couple of days of darkness will stimulate them to climb up seeking light. This not only makes their bases accessible, but loosens their grip making them easier to remove. This approach is tedious but works. You can also use underwater epoxy to trap them in their holes, but for a large outbreak, you may end up with a giant mound of epoxy!"

    Never tried getting them to move by manipulating light, but it sounds interesting. How much CaOH were you dumping on them at one time? I never injected more than about 20 ml 4N NaOH in a 240-gal system during a session and each anemone got about 1-2 ml. I would inject the NaOH and then do a water change and vacuum out the precipatate. NaOH kills tissue on contact, so there is no need to let it sit for a while. Doing it that way never produced any negative system-wide effects.

  11. #11
    Full Colony Member Stev-O's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Bakersfield
    Posts
    1,526
    First Name
    Steven
    Occupation
    Turn to the left....and cough....!!!!
    Referred to CVR by
    Keith and Chris at Whities
    I can inject kalk as I have an endless supply of syringes and needles from work at the moment. It's just very tedious and sometimes the majanos will shrivel up which makes the job even harder. I guess I should just stop looking for an easy way out and stick my hand in the tank again

    As to how much I was dumping...well, let's just say the 4th tank crash is due to overdose of kalk as Fishy would agree...kalk kills...
    "Life is not measured by the breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away."
    "Everybody wants to go to heaven, but nobody wants to die."

    Tank(s): 90G 3'x2'x2' glass Single corner overflow with 20G acrylic growout and 15G sump
    Lights: 400W SE 14K Hamilton on Reeflux ballast with Luminarc III reflector
    Experience: off and on since 1994

  12. #12
    G-Nik
    Guest
    Good luck, and sorry to hear about your troubles, but in my humble opinion, kalkwasser solution or paste is a waste of time in the battle against unwanted anemones.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •